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Why I Love Vinyl, By Members Of Candy Hearts, Touché Amoré, The Movielife + More

Tomas Doyle
Tomas Doyle 16 April 2016 at 16.29

Happy Record Store Day.



It's Record Store Day today. After we asked how streaming affects the way we consume albums, singles and EPs last week, we found out what physical music means to some of our favourite bands.

MARIEL LOVELAND - CANDY HEARTS
WHEN DID YOU START COLLECTING VINYL?
"I was late to the vinyl collecting game - I only started collecting it about three years ago! When we started touring a lot, and I started to see my friends put out these beautiful records, it really inspired me to start my own collection. I think Real Friends' EP was the first vinyl I ever got. They gave it to me when we were on tour together."

WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT VINYL AS OPPOSED TO CDS OR STREAMING?
"Honestly, it's not about sound quality for me at all. I stream music for most the part if I'm listening. With vinyl, I feel like the purpose it serves for me is to collect memories. Like when I look at my favourite Lemonheads record, I remember the amazing day I spent with my boyfriend shopping around Williamsburg and browsing through Rough Trade. When I look at my favourite Weakerthans record, I remember how I had no idea the person who bought it for me had even payed attention to what bands I like -- and when they gave me that record, that was the moment I knew they loved me."

WHAT IS THE MOST VALUABLE RECORD IN YOUR COLLECTION (EITHER IN TERMS OF MONEY OR PERSONAL SENTIMENT)?
"I'm not sure of monetary value, but I think my most favorite and most valuable record is 'Loveless' by My Bloody Valentine. I had been searching for that record for an extremely long time, not because it's musically my favourite album ever but because it grew to mean a lot to me. I had been looking for it for a while but I could only find it for crazy amounts of money on eBay. When we went over to the UK for the Pop Punk's Not Dead Tour, this girl came up to me at our merch table and was like I got you a present. I thanked her and opened it up and I was like Holy! How? How did you get this? How did you even know? I literally cried when I saw she had found it for me."


JEREMY BOLM - TOUCHÉ AMORÉ / HESITATION WOUNDS
WHEN DID YOU START COLLECTING VINYL?
"I got my first 7” in 1998 or so. My favorite band was Far and my Mother had mail ordered me a t-shirt from their label Immortal Records. She most likely told them it was for my birthday so they threw in a Far / Incubus split 7”. I didn’t begin collecting till 2001."

WHAT IS THE MOST VALUABLE RECORD IN YOUR COLLECTION (EITHER IN TERMS OF MONEY OR PERSONAL SENTIMENT)?
"Converge - 'Axe To Fall' (1st Press of 100 - Clear w/ Color Shards). It was a gift from the staff at Deathwish Inc before Touche Amore began working with them. Our booking agent shared an office with there at the time and I got to know the staff really well. They learned of my nerdy collecting ways after they saw my enthusiasm for what they did and asked if I had that press, which I didn’t. Later that day I came back from a coffee run and it was sitting at the desk I had been doing work at. It was such a kind gesture to a geek like me. Converge will always be my favourite aggressive band."

WHY DO YOU THINK VINYL SEEMS TO BE RESURGING IN POPULARITY RECENTLY?
"To be honest I almost feel like the resurgence is already on it’s way out. Trends come and go quickly enough. A part of me is excited about it to be frank. Getting your record press used to be a 8-12 week turnaround when TA started getting records pressed. Now you’re looking at a potential 6+ months. This really hurts bands that need to tour and make a living. Major labels are to blame. They have the big pockets to pay plants to have their vanity projects take precedent. They highly overcharge consumers and because of this the common price of records which used to be about $12-$14 is now $20-$35… This turns buyers and fans away. Music is easily free, and money isn’t easy to come by for teens-young adults who may just be getting into it. Punk rock has always been vinyl based and that won’t stop. True record lovers / collectors will always be there… we’ve never gone away."

WHAT ADVICE / WARNINGS WOULD YOU GIVE TO ANYONE THINKING OF STARTING TO COLLECT RECORDS?
"Don’t just assume you have to pay top dollar for a record. Get excited about digging in second hand stores. You’ll be amazed at what you can find."


VINNIE CARUANA - THE MOVIELIFE / I AM THE AVALANCHE
WHAT IS THE MOST VALUABLE RECORD IN YOUR COLLECTION (EITHER IN TERMS OF MONEY OR PERSONAL SENTIMENT)?
"Most valuable in monetary terms are prob some original pressing Beatles records. They are pretty beat up though. Most valuable to me personally is probably "The Way It Is” - a Revelation Records hardcore compilation. It opened a lot of doors for me and got me into a lot of the pioneering NYHC. Original pressing from 1988. Sick photos too."

WHY DO YOU THINK VINYL SEEMS TO BE RESURGING IN POPULARITY RECENTLY?
"People are in love with music. Vinyl is the only tangible music format that's any fun. Nostalgia is what drives us all to cling to realness. You can hold an album, smell it, and hear its imperfections. It's real."

WHAT ADVICE / WARNINGS WOULD YOU GIVE TO ANYONE THINKING OF STARTING TO COLLECT RECORDS?
"Don't ruin all of your records growing up like I did. Wouldn't mind having some of those back. Fuck it."


HENRY COX - BOSTON MANOR
WHERE AND HOW DO YOU SEEK OUT RECORDS? ANY FAVOURITE SHOPS / WEBSITES / GENERAL HAUNTS TO PICK UP SOME SWEET STUFF?
"The obvious one is Banquet in Kingston. Tom & the team are an integral element of a lot of music scenes in this country and have been supplying the UK with music for years. They're always keen to talk about music, and push music that they love. I think thats one thing that big chain stores can't offer you, is the personal interaction between staff & customer, it's run by real music fans for real music fans. There's also some sick online distros in the UK check out Ambition Records & Monkey Boy Records, they also offer some exclusive pressings of a few records. Other notable record stores to me are Crash & Rhino in Leeds & Piccadilly Records in Manchester."

WHAT IS THE MOST VALUABLE RECORD IN YOUR COLLECTION (EITHER IN TERMS OF MONEY OR PERSONAL SENTIMENT)?
"I don't really own any valuable records, I have a few semi rare records that i'm very fond of. That rare Bad Brains 7" ('Soul Music For Bad People'). I think my favourite record is a 12" 180 gram Gotye single of 'State of The Art'."


CHAD MORGAN STERENBERG - LA DISPUTE
WHERE AND HOW DO YOU SEEK OUT RECORDS? ANY FAVOURITE SHOPS / WEBSITES / GENERAL HAUNTS TO PICK UP SOME SWEET STUFF?
"I’ve been lucky in several cases of picking up entire collections for either next to nothing or entirely for free. I’ve had good luck at the flea market in Detroit where I’ve picked up an entire post office crate of late 80s, early 90s dance singles for 10 dollars. I am extremely intrigued by diving into someone else’s collections because you learn a lot about both that person’s listening habits as well as more about the music as a result. I would have to say my favourite record store is still Vertigo Music in Grand Rapids, MI."

WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT VINYL AS OPPOSED TO, SAY, CDS OR STREAMING?
"When I started collecting, it was honestly the accessibility of it that drew me in. I could find records for pennies and take them home and discover something new. This was before streaming was much of a thing, so in some ways that makes this hunt much easier, albeit maybe stripped of some of the romanticism of going out, searching, and bringing something home with you. There’s still nothing like taking a dusty old vinyl out of its sleeve and discovering an entire new world within. I like to hold something in my hands when I’m listening to music-- to learn about the musicians, and how the record was made. With streaming I’m left in the dark with a lot of that vital information."

WHY DO YOU THINK VINYL SEEMS TO BE RESURGING IN POPULARITY RECENTLY?
"
I think it probably has to do with a number of factors. I saw an interesting chart in David Byrne’s most recent book which shows the rise and fall of each of the major formats in music. When something new comes along it leads to the fall of what came before it. There is very little overlap. We haven’t even seen the peak of streaming, but the CD and the cassette are almost completely irrelevant. I think vinyl is seeing a small comeback due to the fact that people still want something material that they can hold in their hands. It will never disappear, and the same could be said about books, though I don’t think it will ever be anywhere near as big as it once was."

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