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Fall Out Boy’s Pete Wentz: “What’s Worse Than Putting Something Out That You’re Not Proud Of?”

Will Cross
Will Cross 24 September 2017 at 12.25

Pete reveals all on what's happening with 'M A  N   I    A'.



Fall Out Boy's Pete Wentz spoke to the Rock Sound Podcast about EVERYTHING recently. Here's a taste of the interview...

YOU'VE MOVED THE RELEASE DATE OF 'M A  N   I   A' TO JANUARY. WHERE ARE YOU GUYS AT WITH THE ALBUM CURRENTLY?
"It's a work in progress, but we're much further along. It's not necessarily that we weren't far along before, it's just that the songs weren't the right songs, you know what I mean?

"We totally altered the course, which was important. Honestly, we could go around the word and play arenas but be like, 'I'm going to go and promote this record that I think is mediocre'. We don't ever want to do that, so we'd just pivoted.

"I'd say we're 60 or 70 per cent done with the record now."


WHY DIDN'T THE SONGS FEEL RIGHT?
"I don't know. I think we got ourselves into a strange situation when we put out 'Young And Menace'. We were like, 'Well, what's the rest of the body of work?' because we didn't know what the rest of it was going to sound like.

"I think we just kind of let each other do our own thing - rather than serving the art, we ended up serving each other and the songs just weren't compelling to me.

"I was like, 'Do you like this?' and Patrick [Stump, vocals / guitar] was like 'Well, I thought you liked it?' and it turned out neither one of us really did."


DID THE OTHER SONGS NOT GEL AS WELL AS 'YOUNG AND MENACE AND 'CHAMPION'?
"No, I don't think they gelled as well as those two did and those were two very different songs that were meant to serve two very different things.

"'Young And Menace' was like a palette cleanse, like when you're out tasting wine and you sniff the coffee grounds, that was what that was supposed to be, so I think it served its purpose. And then 'Champion' - which I love, I think it's a great song - we'd found our ideal producer before we figured it out but we came up with some really cool stuff with Jesse Shatkin who I think is a monster for production.

"But now we've figured it out, we're working with a couple of different producers and they're all super specific, you don't bring the elephant gun when you're hunting rabbits or whatever!"


IS 'THE LAST OF THE REAL ONES' FROM THOSE EARLY SESSIONS OR DID IT COME RECENTLY?
"Much more recently, I don't think that people will hear anything else from the original 'M A  N   I    A' sessions, at least in their current incarnation, maybe you'll get a melody or a couple lyrics or something, but for the most part it's all scrapped."

IS 'YOUNG AND MENACE' AS LEFT-FIELD AS THIS ALBUM IS GOING TO GET?
"When me and Patrick talk about it... I think he would disagree with me! He thinks we go further than 'Young and Menace', but I think that's because he's at the inception of the song so it all sounds different to him.

"I think that 'Young And Menace' is about as far left as we're going to go, but I think there are other ones that are in between. 'The Last Of The Real Ones' felt anthemic from the first time I heard the piano line, but it's still odd because it's just a simple piano line. I think of 'American Beauty/American Psycho' and 'Save Rock And Roll' almost as like a single album cycle because it was so back to back, so there's other stuff that will be a jump from that...

"It's more world-influenced than I think we've ever gone before. I'm so fascinated by a lot of what's happening in Latin and African music right now and, although we have the constraints of being a band, I think those influences are coming through more."


WAS IT A DIFFICULT CALL TO MOVE THE ALBUM BACK?
"It wasn't in the sense... that what's worse than putting something out that you're not proud of or that you think is a mediocre record? The alternative has to be better than whatever that is, especially with the culture we live in right now with the internet, there's no room for mediocrity. You either put out something really good or something really bad and that'll make noise, you can polarise people like 'Young And Menace' did, but there's no room for mediocrity because there's too much stuff out there - you'll get no reaction.

"If Lucasfilm was like, 'We'll put out Star Wars right now, it'll be like whatever. You give us three more months, we'll give you a really good version of Star Wars' - me as a fan would be like, 'Yeah you should definitely take the three months, I don't want to see a mediocre version'."


To listen to the full interview with Pete and loads more exciting stuff, subscribe to the Rock Sound Podcast here!

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