Visit the shop
Features

Fall Out Boy’s Patrick Stump: “We Were Trying To Be More Of Something Else”

Rock Sound
Rock Sound 19 December 2017 at 14.31

Patrick chats all about FOB's rise to greatness.

Fall Out Boy were the first ever inductees into the Hall Of Fame at the Rock Sound Awards powered by EMP

In the magazine Patrick Stump and Pete Wentz open up about the band's legacy. Here's a taste:

WHAT IS IMPORTANT YOU STARTED FROM THE GROUND UP WITH SOMETHING THAT DIDN'T SOUND LIKE ANYTHING ELSE?
“Oh, definitely because we were trying to be more of something else. We were aiming for something. All the bands in Chicago at the time that we could have played with were either really serious Midwestern emo stuff, Fat Wreck pop-punk stuff or hardcore bands - and we didn’t really fit into any of those things.

I was very involved in hardcore but I was always kind of a silly fit for the hardcore scene, I’ll totally admit that! And so as much as I wanted to mosh, I think I couldn’t help be more melodic – that was just more natural to me. As much as we wanted to zero in on any one sound, we couldn’t because all four of us came from different places musically and kinda landed in this thing, so yeah it’s really funny - we couldn’t have premeditated that if we tried because we were trying to sound like New Found Glory or whatever, and we didn’t!  Overall really we couldn’t not sound like ourselves, we just couldn’t!”


'FROM UNDER THE CORK TREE' IS ONE OF THE MOST INFLUENTIAL ALBUMS OF THE LAST 10 YEARS. WHAT WAS THE ATMOSPHERE IN THE CAMP LIKE IN THE RUN UP? PETE SAID YOU JUST WENT IN AND DID IT, IGNORING THE PRESSURES.
“Sort of, I mean I think I felt a little bit of different pressure than what Pete did. I think I had a different fire than what he did, because he was in this zone where he was just writing. He was just so prolific and so good that it really was low pressure for him because everything he was writing was some really inspired stuff. I knew that I never felt that I fit into the scenes, I didn’t really fit into the emo thing, I didn’t really fit into the pop-punk thing, I didn’t really fit into the hardcore thing, if I’m ever going to be myself as a musician - I have to start now. 

‘Take This To Your Grave’ was a happy accident and there are moments on that record that shine. ‘Cork Tree’ I was like, ‘Well, my dad never got signed’ - my dad was a musician – my dad never got signed, so I’m only going to get one shot at this so if I’m ever going to do anything in music - I want to lay the blueprint for it now. 

So I set out to make that record really eclectic and really stretch the boundaries of what we were allowed to do. It’s funny now because ‘Dance, Dance’ sounds like a pop-punk song, but at the time that song sounded so crazy to people. When we’d play it to our friends in other bands, they’d be like, ‘What is this!? This is wild, it’s like Motown or something’ - and it’s not! Obviously it doesn’t sound like that, but at the time it was so radically different than other stuff."

IN 'SUGAR WE'RE GOING DOWN' YOU WROTE ONE OF THE BIGGEST AND MOST LOVED SONGS OF THIS CENTURY. WERE YOU AT ALL AWARE WHAT YOU'D MADE AND WHAT WAS ABOUT TO HAPPEN?
"I mean that song changed my life, I have a music career in a large part due to that song. I knew that some of our fans would like that song because we had a small following from ‘Take This To Your Grave’ I didn’t know that everyone was going to like that song. I didn’t know that would be a song that I’d still be singing over a decade later. It just felt like a really strong song. You never know when you make a hit."

Grab the band's very special cover and poster bundle from awards.rocksound.tv

Rock Sound Online

More Rock Sound

View More